Surviving The Holidays With Food Sensitivities

File Dec 08, 11 20 19 AM

21 Days of Blogging- Day 2.

Few things seem to bring out people’s food issues like sharing a meal at the holidays.

During this time of year you’ll hear about people gaining 10 pounds of ‘holiday weight’ as they gorge themselves on the lovely indulgence of traditional dishes that don’t always serve a healthy or healing body.

During these festive get togethers my sensitivity and avoidance to foods that contain gluten, dairy, sugar, some nightshades, and corn frequently feels like an issue or an inconvenience if I’m the only one eating that way.

If you would have known me several years ago I was the first one to the table as I sampled through everything the table had to offer and then go back for seconds. Family dinners were awesome.

Those awesome eating experiences changed when I quit eating gluten and dairy. People generally don’t have any idea how to modify their recipes (nor do I ever expect them to do so only for me) so unless I expose my digestive system to gluten and dairy I am left out from enjoying everything on the menu. My experience has often been that I will be able to eat the meat (when I’m eating meat) if it doesn’t have any weird spices or sauces and I can eat the veggies if they are not dressed with butter or cheese. It is a very limiting experience and if not planned for a major let down while everybody else is drooling over their decadent food and you are left with plain food.

  1. When possible, talk with the host beforehand about what is being planned for the menu and ask if you can bring anything and/or if they can set aside your portions without dairy and sauces containing gluten.
  2. Bring your own dishes or sauces and make enough to share. Your dish might be the one thing on the table you will eat.
  3. Be grateful. No matter if you can only eat one thing on the table, you can eat one thing. Enjoy every healthy bite while you share time with loved ones.
  4. Prepare to have other people feel bad for you because you are so fragile and limited and can’t indulge like they can. Ugh.
  5. Try to keep your manners and not be judgemental when people tell you how they know they would be much healthier if they gave up certain foods and then proceed to pile said foods on their plate, eat them up in front of you then complain about their indigestion and bloated bellies after dinner. Its an odd experience for me to watch and an exercise in holding my tongue.
  6. Prepare to not be able to have dessert. This one hurts. As a foodie, this one hurts. Bring your own, if possible.
  7. Remember why you are skipping the foods that cause angst in your body. Honoring your body with the best food possible will leave you feeling better in the morning.

When you face food limitations because of your health, you also get to witness how limited other people are in the same old food habits they don’t feel are necessary to upgrade.

Good luck keeping your food healthy this holiday season! We got this.

See you tomorrow.

Pam Dyer is a Holistic Health Coach who trains people with scoliosis and chronic illness how they can improve sleep, gut health, immunity, and brain function to live full and hurt less.  To book a consult with Pam please email:  butterflysessions@gmail.com  

Sweet Potato And Leek Ginger Soup

With a shift in the seasons from winter to spring brings an attention to a new menu of local fresh foods. In the Pacific Northwest leeks, garlic, baby greens, peas, radishes, and rhubarb are just a few of the exciting seasonal ingredients worth adding to your menu. With that in mind I bring you my latest soup recipe that is very easy to make, delicious, versatile, and really good for you.

I recently discovered a simple way to use fresh ginger to create a broth and have since been creating different versions of this soup loaded with beautiful colors and packed with nutrients. The ginger and garlic add a nice spice and serious immunity boosting qualities. The abundance of vegetables provides your digestive system with a healthy serving of fiber.

Leeksoup2

Sweet Potato and Leek  Ginger Soup

4 inch piece of ginger, scrubbed and thickly sliced

2 leeks, chopped

1 lg sweet purple potato, cubed

3-4 cloves garlic, chopped

2-3 carrots, chopped

4 stalks of celery, chopped

salt and pepper

  1. Put the ginger in a large pot of hot water and and simmer for about 20 minutes while prepping the other veggies. Your option here is to remove the ginger before adding the rest of the ingredients, be hardcore and eat the ginger in the soup, or pick it out as you eat.
  2. Add all other ingredients to the ginger broth and simmer for about 20 minutes.
  3. Serve immediately and store leftovers in the fridge for about 3 days or freeze for future quick meals.
Leeksoupjar
This batch of soup was made with white sweet potatoes.

Cheers to a happy and healthy spring season!

Pam Dyer is a Holistic Health Coach who trains people with scoliosis and chronic illness how they can improve sleep, gut health, immunity, and brain function to live full and hurt less.  To book a consult with Pam please email:  butterflysessions@gmail.com